Executive Assistant Resume Sample

8 MINUTE READ BY Molly O'Brien

My Perfect Resume » Resume Examples By Industry » Administration Resumes » Executive Assistant Resume Sample

Crafting an executive assistant professional resume that catches the attention of a busy executive can feel a little overwhelming. In our executive assistant resume sample, you’ll see what information you must include and an example of a great format.

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For more hands-on help with your resume, My Perfect Resume offers a resume builder and tips that guide you through each step of the writing process. Based on your job title, we’ll offer you personalized phrases and ideas on how to make your resume stand out. Take advantage of our tools to write an impressive executive assistant resume quickly.

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An administrative assistant resume

As an executive assistant, you’ll need to pay attention to details and stay organized. Use My Perfect Resume to make sure your resume uses the necessary language and structure to reflect your skills in these areas.

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Executive assistants handle large amounts of data each day. To demonstrate your skills presenting data in a concise, professional manner, use a format that is easy to read and list your information in bullet points rather than paragraphs.

Executive Assistant Resume Questions

  • What can you do to make your executive assistant resume stand out?

    Assume you only have a few seconds to impress your reader. Packing each section of your resume with important key terms is a great way to present your qualifications. Research general executive assistant job requirements to learn some top phrasing to include. Additionally, learn as much as you can about the specific job you want to apply for and tailor your resume to its requirements.

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    Some employers scan incoming resumes through an Applicant Tracking System. The ATS selects documents that contain a particular number of keywords and discards the others. This happens before a human being ever sees your resume. To increase your chances of passing the ATS, use the exact terms you see in the job posting throughout your resume’s sections.

    Employers looking for executive assistants generally prize qualities such as punctuality, organization, and communication skills. Many also want to see proficiency in specific computer programs. If you have experience in a prospective employer’s particular industry, it is a good idea to emphasize that as well.

  • How should you structure your executive assistant resume?

    First, check the job listing or application instructions for specific instructions as to resume style. When the employer does not state a preference, follow the conventional format. Place a short summary statement below your contact information, then include your skills list, work history, and education.

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    Within your work history section, start with your current or most recent employment, then list previous jobs in reverse chronological order. Do include jobs in other fields, but also focus on skills with relevance to your performance as an executive assistant.

    In each section, make sure the information stays relevant to your qualifications as an executive assistant. Your resume should present information clearly; busy hiring managers will not put in work to understand what you want to tell them.

  • How should you present software knowledge on an executive assistant resume?

    While the skills list seems the obvious section to put software proficiencies, you can emphasize them by using other parts of your resume as well. Your summary statement can include one or two most essential computer skills. In your work history, you can show how you used a particular skill to perform your job functions. The education section is a great place to list computer training courses and certificates.

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  • How do you write an objective statement for an executive assistant resume?

    As you can see, our executive assistant resume sample does not include an objective statement. This is because current resume convention opts for a summary statement instead. Rather than telling the employer what you hope to gain from the job, you present a quick summary of what the employer will gain from hiring you.

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    Have you ever opened a book, read the first few words, and returned it to the shelf? Don’t let this happen to your resume. Your summary is the opening sentence, so use active, snappy language to make it interesting. Because you have limited space, make sure every word you use conveys information. There is no room for filler.

    Keep your summary to about three information-packed sentences. Include your industry background and some top qualities and skills that showcase your performance as an executive assistant. At least some of the attributes you list here should include the employer’s requirements and preferences.

  • How many skills should you put on an executive assistant resume?

    Resume experts usually recommend listing between six and 10 skills. Fewer can look unimpressive while more tend to take up too much room and lose the reader’s focus. Choose your information for this section based on its relevance to the executive assistant job you want. Your forklift operating skills may be impressive, but they likely do not belong here.

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    Presenting a broad range of skill types shows employers you have what it takes to do the job. More than that, it demonstrates that you understand the various aspects of the position and will not focus on one to the detriment of the others.

    This section should present a mix of computer, specific industry, organizational, and soft skills. Include specific details such as the names of software programs and your typing speed. Executive assistants spend a lot of time interacting with other employers, customers, and vendors. Thus, it is important to include skills relating to cooperation, communication, and customer service.

  • What skills and qualities does a successful administrative assistant possess?

    While specific requirements may vary, there are some universal skills that define excellence for administrative assistants.

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    Listing those you possess can increase your chance of landing the job you want. The following attributes from our executive assistant resume sample offer some inspiration and ideas as you sit down to write your own document:

    • Proficient in Microsoft Word and Excel
    • Quick to learn and adapt
    • Excellent communicator via telephone and face-to-face
    • Attentive to detail
    • Highly organized
    • Excel at multitasking in a fast-paced environment
    • Strong team player
    • Motivated, independent worker

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Action Verbs for Your Executive Assistant Resume

Our executive assistant resume sample contains action verbs that emphasize professional skills in as few words as possible for maximum impact. Be sure to add action verbs to your resume; here are 15 ideas for your work history section:


  • Arranged
  • Corrected
  • Maintained
  • Updated
  • Gathered
  • Communicated
  • Evaluated
  • Informed
  • Summarized
  • Compared
  • Catalogued
  • Distributed
  • Filed
  • Prepared
  • Handled
SHOW MORE…Add Action Verbs to Your Resume

Skills for Your Executive Assistant Resume

It’s essential your resume contains a number of your most well-developed professional skills selected according to each individual job description. These skills show employers what you’re capable of and whether you’re an ideal candidate. Take a look at our executive assistant resume sample and add skills to your resume like these:


  • Active listening
  • Writing
  • Reading comprehension
  • Service orientation
  • Speaking
  • Critical evaluation
  • Ethical practice
  • Relationship management
  • Cultural and global awareness
  • Oral comprehension
  • Oral expression
  • AA/Bachelor’s degree
  • Knowledge of technology
  • Organization skills
  • Prioritize workload
SHOW MORE… Add Skills to Your Resume

Certifications to Include in Your Executive Assistant Resume

An executive assistant can prove career knowledge and skills with Certified Administrative Professional credentials. The International Association of Administrative Professionals issues the CAP certification.

You can also earn the Microsoft Office Specialist certification. This shows your expertise in Microsoft’s office productivity applications.

A certification is not the same thing as a certificate. Learning institutions issue certificates upon completion of courses or curricula. Certifications show both industry-relevant aptitude and professional commitment.

Earning a certification usually involves passing exams and paying an application fee. You may also need to meet relevant work experience and education requirements. Obtaining them is well worth the effort, as they’ll help you stand out from other jobseekers. You should list them in a dedicated “Certifications” section of your resume. Check out our executive assistant resume sample for guidance on formatting and content.

Executive Assistant Job Search: Next Steps

You’ve polished your resume to perfection and your interview was a success. What’s the next step after getting your job offer? Read our smart advice on salary negotiation.


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7 Quick Tips for Negotiating Salary at Your New Job

When you use the guidance of our executive assistant resume sample, you can construct your own outstanding document that may lead to new job opportunities. If you receive a job offer for an exciting role, use these tips to negotiate:


1.Understand Your Worth. Do your research beforehand. Figure out the standard salaries for executive assistants and similar roles in your industry. This helps you determine the pay range you are seeking and provides credible justification for your request. Knowing your worth can also bolster your confidence and courage in navigating this intimidating process.

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2.Prepare and Rehearse. Once you know your value, prepare your case. Think of all the qualifications you bring to the table and consider compiling a list of your achievements to show hiring managers exactly what you can do. Establish beforehand the exact pay you’re seeking. Then, practice negotiating. Know how to word your requests and respond to counter-offers.

3.Conduct Yourself Well. Be aware of how you are presenting yourself as you negotiate. Show confidence in yourself by keeping your head high and behaving in a calm, relaxed manner, but do not be too aggressive or demanding as you speak. Remain courteous as you negotiate, show enthusiasm for the role, and keep the conversation positive.

4.Know Your Numbers. Have in your mind a firm idea of the exact pay range you are seeking. The top of your range is your absolute ideal number that is perhaps slightly out of reach, and the bottom is the very minimum amount you are willing to accept.When you negotiate, start toward the top of your range and be specific. Rather than requesting $60,000, ask for $59,500, as this may result in a higher final offer.

5.Consider Other Perks. Is salary the only priority you have? Sometimes, a hiring manager cannot offer more than a certain amount due to the company’s policies. Think about benefits. Is the employer willing to allow you to work from home some days, increase your vacation days, or pay for all or most of your health insurance? If the pay seems a little too low but the other perks are high, the offer may still be desirable.

6.Counter. Do not fear a “no.” A hiring manager may say the company cannot accommodate your initial request, but that does not mean the conversation is over. This is a negotiation, so feel free to counter. Ask questions to understand why the employer is hesitant, state your excitement for the job, and declare an intention to find a compromise that benefits both you and the company.

7.Know When the Conversation Is Over. Know exactly what you need in pay and benefits to be enthusiastic about the role. Have a limit in your mind before you begin negotiating. This way, if you and the hiring manager cannot compromise enough, you know you are making the right choice in walking away.

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Time To Write Your Executive Assistant Resume

After reading about and reviewing tips on how to write a stellar executive assistant resume, it’s time to build your own. Whether you’re tweaking an existing resume or starting from scratch, you’ll find that an executive assistant resume sample helps get the creative juices flowing.

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If you find a sample is not quite enough, use our professional resume builder to start the process. Remember how important it is to use action verbs in your document? Between our resume sample and builder, you can see how to do this like a pro.

If you appreciate a guide that takes you through the process step-by-step, you will be happy with our resume builder. You can rest easy knowing you put your resume together in a way that will impress the hiring manager. My Perfect Resume’s resume builder helps promote your work experience and abilities to land the position you want.

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author

Molly O'Brien

Molly O’Brien is a Senior Product Manager at BOLD. With a passion for building great products, Molly has become an expert in envisioning and creating content and technology that helps job seekers find the jobs they want, quickly.

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